#1 New Year’s Resolutions & Three Reasons Why We Shouldn’t Set Them

new-years-resolution-list

The #1 New Year’s Resolution should be; “Don’t make New Year’s Resolutions.” RESET is all about embracing change. So why would I publicly propose that you shouldn’t make New Year’s Resolutions? Because they don’t work! In January 2013 Forbes published an article that states only 8% of people achieve their New Year’s Resolutions. Typically, resolutions are made with the best intentions that are seldom fulfilled.

Three reasons it is short sighted to make resolutions to change starting the first of the new year are:

               1. It is hard to do anything with a hangover.

               2. There is nothing special about doing something everyone else does.

               3. New Year’s Day only lasts a day as do most resolutions.

Three good reasons not to make New Year’s Resolutions are:

               1. It emphasizes unrealistic major changes instead of daily incremental progress.

               2. It limits the focus on change to once a year instead embracing change all year.

               3. Increases tendency to make too big of a change in too little time.

All the above, wrapped with the sub-conscious influence of years of not keeping New Year’s Resolutions, undermines the belief and commitment it takes to make personal changes. Making a list of resolutions for the new year is like building a house of cards. One failure results in a cascade of failures and collapse.

Building a house of habits over time is a more sustainable approach. Make a list of twelve healthy habits or changes to work on over the year. Plan on starting a new habit each month and stack one on the other over a longer period of time. Building a “Habit House” is like building any other sustainable structure. The foundation is the most important part. Make your list of twelve and pick the one that will be the core or foundation to stack the others on as the months go by. Keeping balance in your life means keeping balance in your change objectives. Your list should cover four areas for personal progress, physical, mental, spiritual, and financial. Don’t worry that New Year’s Day has passed. That is the great thing about embracing change is that you can start any day of the year. Make a list of twelve habits, improvements, or activities you want to change. I will share my list in the next few days and introduce the Progress Pyramid concept.

 

 

 

 

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